Exploring the Living Quaker Tradition

Showing 17–28 of 28 results

    Julian of Norwich: ‘There was a treasure in the earth which the Lord loved.’

    Julian of Norwich: ‘There was a treasure in the earth which the Lord loved.’ Julian’s writings are complex and deep but their meanings are beautiful in their simplicity. We are the treasure. The course will aim to engage with Julian, the woman, her life and spirituality, offering the opportunity to explore her words through reflection, music and laughter. Discover how the message of her Revelations for the world is as relevant today as it was in the 14th Century. There will be times to be quiet, times to discuss and times to Simply Be.

    Exploring the Old Testament

    Does the Old Testament puzzle, perplex or put you off?  Come and discover some of its riches and beauty, as well as its agonised responses to suffering and violence.  We will explore the contexts in which the Hebrew Bible was written, and then trace the different ways in which it has been interpreted in Jewish and Christian traditions.  The tutor was commended by a local Quaker meeting for “Profound insights with a lightness of touch”.  Anyone welcome – no prior knowledge required.

    Gender and the Divine: learning from feminist religion

    Judaism and Christianity both have strong traditions of using gendered language to describe God. This has often been masculine but, both historically and recently, there are also feminine examples. In this course we will explore ways in which feminist Christians and Jews have re-read Biblical texts, re-worked their traditions, and found resources to describe a Divine who is masculine, feminine, both, and neither.  We will also take time to consider how this affects our own relationships with God.

    Conference: Depicting religious characters in 19th century fiction

    A day conference organised jointly by the Centre for Research in Quaker Studies and Keele University on all aspects of religious characters in nineteenth-century fiction. The conference is open to all with an interest in the subject, including postgraduate students.  If you would like to present a twenty minute paper, please contact Betty Hagglund, betty.hagglund@woodbrooke.org.uk before the end of April.

    The conference fee of £50 includes lunch and refreshments. Accommodation, if required, should be booked separately.

    Multiple Religious Belonging

    Quaker-Pagan. Anglican and Buddhist. Jewish and Christian (and interested in shamanism). Multiple religious identities are becoming more visible in the Western world as globalisation makes us more aware of the possibilities and religion is increasingly seen as something private which can be chosen at will. This course will explore what it is like to belong to more than one religious tradition, ask how and why people might set out on that path, and give space to reflect on the implications. This course involves a time commitment of approximately 2-3 hours per week.

    Pure Motions: the spiritual journeys of John Woolman

    This day event takes place at Friargate Meeting House, York.

    The spiritual life of John Woolman was inseparable from his travelling ministry. As he went, he felt the movement of the spirit, challenged injustice, and shared his understanding of God’s love. During this day event held at York’s Friargate Meeting House, we’ll examine his life and works and consider how his travels gave him new opportunities to encounter God and proclaim the Kingdom. Together we’ll reflect on how our own journeys might become a spiritual discipline, both renewing and prophetic. Join us on Sunday for an early-morning Prayer Walk before Meeting for Worship at 10.30am. For more information see our website or visit the website of Friargate Meeting House. http://www.yorkquakers.org.uk/friargatequakerm.html

    Bible Study for Quakers

    Do you find the Bible intimidating but intriguing? Do you want to engage your meeting in Bible study? This course will help you to find your way around the Bible and understand the distinctive Quaker approach to scripture. You will closely study several Biblical texts and reflect with others on your experience of the Bible. Each of the six units will be accompanied by a group study plan, supporting you in sharing your learning with your local Quaker community. Each unit contains video, audio and written materials to engage with, and forums to share reflections and ask questions. There will be a live online Q&A on Tuesday 30th July at 19.00 GMT+1. If you can’t join this discussion live, it will be recorded for you to watch at your convenience. This course involves a time commitment of approximately 2-3 hours per week.

    Galatians

    ‘For freedom Christ has set us free’. This is the heart of Paul’s teaching in this letter. Here is Paul’s most radical expression of how the experience of the Spirit can transform how people think of themselves and treat each other. In this online course we will tackle the letter step by step, aiming to bring Paul’s words alive, find connections with Quaker understandings, and better understand Paul’s confidence that faith in the living word can bring a new creation. The course will be run as a series of six webinars run from 6.30pm to 8.00pm every Tuesday evening from 07 May to 28 May. This course involves a time commitment of approximately 2-3 hours per week.

    A Place for the Scriptures: a course at Swarthmoor Hall

    The approach of early Friends to Scripture was extremely controversial. Their experience of the living Spirit made them suspicious of placing authority in a fixed text – but they believed this insight was rooted in the Bible itself. How do we now articulate the Quaker approach? And how does it shape how the Bible is used among Friends? This course is part of a continuing exploration of how Friends today relate to the Bible without compromising Quaker insights.

    To book Woodbrooke courses at Swarthmoor Hall please email info@swarthmoorhall.co.uk or ring 01229 583204

     

    The Inner Light: an exploration of eastern spiritual poetry – at Swarthmoor Hall

    The weekend will include a wide ranging survey of the ways in which Far and Middle Eastern scriptures and poetry have explored and expressed the nature and consequences of spiritual aspiration. We shall consider the thought and style of texts from pre-history to the Middle Ages, including Lao Tzu, Indian scriptures, Rumi and Hafiz, focussing on their evocation of the difficulties and rewards of spiritual work, and how their insights may assist our own understanding and development. All texts will be studied in translation

    To book Woodbrooke courses at Swarthmoor Hall please email info@swarthmoorhall.co.uk or ring 01229 583204

     

    Developing a Practice of Christian Meditation: at Swarthmoor Hall

    An introduction to an ancient Christian way of prayer beyond words, as taught in our time by Benedictine monks John Main (1926 – 82) and Laurence Freeman (1951-). The emphasis will be on practising meditation together and beginning to understand its rationale, its effect on our daily lives, our understanding of ourselves, of each other and of God.

    To book Woodbrooke courses at Swarthmoor Hall please email info@swarthmoorhall.co.uk or ring 01229 583204

    Mothers of Israel: exploring the writing of early Quaker women: at Swarthmoor Hall

    The early Quaker movement was unusual in its time for the freedom it afforded women to be preachers, prophets and writers. This course will enable you to explore the lives, and writings of a number of important seventeenth century Quaker women. This will include Margaret Fell, Martha Simmonds, Sarah Blackborow, Dorothy White and Elizabeth Bathurst. In our sessions we will get to know these women using short talks, the reading of texts and group discussion within a safe and friendly atmosphere.

    To book Woodbrooke courses at Swarthmoor Hall please email info@swarthmoorhall.co.uk or ring 01229 583204