Quaker Studies

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    Quaker Studies September 2009



    Author: ‘Ben’ Pink Dandelion (Ed)

    Desc: CONTENTS

    TEN YEARS OF BIRMINGHAM: AN EXTENDED EDITORIAL

    ACCUSATIONS OF BLASPHEMY IN ENGLISH ANTI-QUAKER POLEMIC, C. 1660–1701 David Manning

    STAGING QUAKERISM IN AMERICAN THEATRE AND FILM James Emmett Ryan

    FELLOWSHIP, SERVICE AND THE ‘SPIRIT OF ADVENTURE’: THE RELIGIOUS SOCIETY OF FRIENDS AND THE OUTDOORS MOVEMENT IN BRITAIN, C. 1900–1950 Mark Freeman

    MODERN TESTIMONIES: THE APPROACH OF QUAKERS TO SUBSTANCE USE AND GAMBLING Helena Chambers

    VIRTUOUS FRIENDS: MORALITY AND QUAKER IDENTITY Jackie Leach Scully

    Book Reviews

    Quaker Studies September 2010



    Author: ‘Ben’ Pink Dandelion (Ed)

    Desc: The issue starts off with an article by Richard Allen on the migration of Nantucket Whalers to Milford Haven in the eighteenth century. These Quakers had had their ships seized because of their pacifist position during the American war of Independence and were faced with financial ruin. It is a history of combining spiritual witness and business interests although it is interesting that most of the whalers returned to North America by 1806. Milford Haven was established over that twenty-year period but Quakerism there went into decline after its short-lived influx.

    Julia Bush’s article explores Caroline Stephen’s opposition to woman’s suffrage in the early twentieth century. Bush explores the variety of influences on Stephen and, linking with Pam Lunn’s article in Quaker Studies 2/1, argues that this position was far from anomalous in a Religious Society riven with ‘widespread doubts over the appropriateness of women’s entry into parliamentary politics. The Religious Society of Friends was divided on the subject and her eloquence was a valuable support to conservative gender views within the Society and beyond it’.

    This issue also carries the last of the papers presented to the 2008 QSRA Conference on the sociology of British Quakerism which became the Cambridge Scholars publication The Quaker Condition: The Sociology of a Liberal Religion. The chapters here by Susan Robson and Judy Frith examine Quaker attitudes to conflict and making choices about time. Robson argues that a don’t see, don’t ask, don’t tell attitude is prevalent amongst British Friends and compares it with a contrasting approach found amongst Irish Quakers. Judy Frith’s work on how Quakers make choices about time reveals a ‘polychronic’ approach whereby Quakers operate different registers of time and mange their clocks through constructing a ‘temporal collage’ (interesting comparisons with Jackie Leach Scully’s analysis that Quakers operated a collage approach to their ethical decision-making—see Quaker Studies 14/1).

    We have research notes on the tripartite longitudinal ‘Present and Prevented’ study, the conclusion of which we hope to report on in the next year, as well as the market research carried out on public perceptions of Quakers in Britain.

    In this issue, we finally catch up with the backlog of book reviews. Apologies to you the readers and the reviewers: we will have a steadier stream in future.

    Betty Hagglund is now Deputy Editor as well as Reviews Editor and Helen Smith Assistant Reviews Editor.

    ‘Ben’ Pink Dandelion

    The Problem of Quaker Identity



    Author: Peter Collins

    Desc: THE PROBLEM OF QUAKER IDENTITY

    The paper constitutes a summary of my attempts, during the past 15 years, to understand contemporary Quakers and Quakerism. The issue on which I focus is the difficulty in representing Quaker identity given the heterogeneity of Quaker belief. During the last decade I have found three approaches useful in analysing this problem. In the first place, I found that Quaker identity is revealed through their talk in and around Meeting. Although each individual friend has a unique biographical trajectory, this talk tends to be both storied and thematic. Furthermore, such narrative discourse is coloured by one particularly pervasive character of canonic Quakerism: the plain. Quakers have always preferred the plain to the embellished or ornamented—both in their theology, their speech and in their material culture. I extend my earlier work on plaining here by reference to the work of Webb Keane and Bruno Latour. Third, and finally, I describe how the work of Pierre Bourdieu and especially his work on habitus and practice theory has contributed to the way in which I understand the enduring character of the Quaker Meeting.

    There’s Death in the Pot



    Author: Elizabeth A. O’Donnell

    Desc: ‘THERE’S DEATH IN THE POT!’ THE BRITISH FREE PRODUCEMOVEMENT AND THE RELIGIOUS SOCIETY OF FRIENDS, WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE NORTH-EAST OF ENGLAND

    Ethical consumerism was one of the strategies used during the protracted struggle against slavery and was especially popular with Friends. From simple abstention from slave-grown produce to the promotion of alternative goods, it provided a means to bridge the distance between the consumer and the enslaved. This paper surveys the background to the mid-nineteenth-century British Free Produce Movement and explores the problems and opposition its supporters encountered. The reasons for the inability of the movement to develop mass appeal even amongst abolitionists, or for it to have any noticeable impact on the outcome of anti-slavery campaigning, are examined, as is its role in revitalising abolitionism at a time when interest had diminished. Particular emphasis is placed on ethical consumerism in the north-east anti-slavery movement, including the coordination of the Free Produce Movement from about 1846 to 1854, by Newcastle Quakers Henry and Anna Richardson.

    Minding the Future



    Author: Christine Davis