Engagement in the World

Showing 1–10 of 28 results

    Politics – finding your way

    This course is being held by Maud Grainger working alongside Friends active in political engagement. How do we engage with those in positions of political power, do we work alongside them in dialogue or do we campaign and resist? This course will bring together those active in political engagement to share their experiences with you. We will also look at case studies and ways of political action and reflect upon these so that you might find your path.

    Let your Life Preach

    Are we challenging the injustices in the world? In worship are we hearing the cries of the world and are we responding to the call to act?
    Together we will explore the roots of our tradition to see how this helps us today. ‘In our communities we can find ways to challenge, to test and to work together to build the kingdom of heaven on earth. This may be challenging, this may be uncomfortable but we can work together with love and tenderness. Friends, it’s time to ask ourselves, if we were accused of being Quakers, would there be enough evidence to convict us?’
    This course can be completed in your own time, although we recommend setting aside 2-3 hours a week.
    Each week there will be video, audio and written materials for you to engage with, and forums for you to share reflections and ask questions.

    Bayard Rustin: reflections on his life and witness

    Bayard Rustin was one of the most important civil, human and labour rights activists. African American and gay, his life’s work was in standing up for marginalised people. He was an important influence on Martin Luther King, persuading him to adopt the principles of non-violence resistance in the struggle for civil rights. This online course will explore how he put his Quaker faith into action. A study of his writings and songs, as well as literature, film and art inspired by him, will allow us to approach his life from a variety of perspectives.
    This course can be completed in your own time, although we recommend setting aside 2-3 hours a week.
    Each week there will be video, audio and written materials for you to engage with, and forums for you to share reflections and ask questions.
    This course is aimed at anyone with an interest in Quakers and/or issues of social justice, but no previous knowledge of Quakerism is required.

    Quaker Women and Social Justice: learning from their experience

    What might we learn about social justice from Quaker history? This online course will look at social and economic concerns of some Quaker women activists, both British and American, in the 1800's and early 1900's. We will consider their strategies, motivation, and the faith basis of their work in the context of society at the time. Through readings and friendly discussion, participants will come to share our enthusiasm for these pioneering leaders and will gain insight into modern manifestations of social injustice.

    This course can be completed in your own time, although we recommend setting aside 2-3 hours a week.
    Each week there will be video, audio and written materials for you to engage with, and forums for you to share reflections and ask questions.
    This course is intended for anyone with an interest in Quakers and social justice. No prior knowledge of either is necessary.

    Anger Management with Art

    This course is for anyone who wants to look at anger issues using art materials - those wanting to look at their own anger, those working with others who are angry, or both. No ability in art is needed, just a willingness to have a go. We will look at what anger is; whether it is good or bad; at the physical symptoms of anger; the influence of early family patterns; using relaxation and assertiveness to manage anger more constructively.

    Quakers and European Politics

    For almost 40 years European Friends have been worked alongside the institutions developed following the devastation of the Second World War. Following the referendum decision in 2016, we would like to invite you to explore the future of peace and human rights in Europe. What can be done now to build a Europe that will give hope to its citizens and to the world. How can we support the mechanisms of European dialogue, initially proposed by William Penn in 1693?

    From Militarisation to Peace

    We will be examining militarism and the culture of domination. We will deconstruct the case for militarism and look at how it is changing our culture. What is the radical alternative in our lives and in global relationships? How can this transition to a more peaceful culture be brought about? This course can be taken on its own or with the other Faith, Peace, Power course, ‘What can you say? Speaking up and Speaking out’.

    Resilient Communities

    Amid the current political upheavals, governments are neglecting responses to climate change, water depletion and other ecological crises. We need stronger local communities to cope and thrive in an unpredictable future. This course will include creative exploration of possible scenarios, practical skill sharing, and practices to build the healthy spiritual lives and relationships that underpin a resilient community. We hope people will return home energised and empowered to take practical action in their own communities and/or Quaker meeting.

    What can you say? Speaking up and Speaking out?

    This course will build on the ground covered in the previous Faith, Peace, Power course, ‘From Militarisation to Peace’ but can also be taken alone. We will explore how we can best express our testimony to peace and commitment to the abolition of war, speaking and acting confidently from our place of conviction. As part of this course we will invite you to explore ways in which you can extend your commitment to peace and be supported in doing so.

    Living at the edge, living as a Quaker

    Our Quaker faith often pushes us to hold unpopular positions, to live on the edge of acceptability. How do we strike the balance between citizen and outlaw? How do we remain faithful in a world that wants us to conform? This retreat will allow us to explore the tensions in our lives between acting as mystic-activists and reconciling voices in a hurting world, and to share strategies for remaining authentic in the everyday, ‘in the world but not of it.’